Almaden lake feasibility alternatives

One of them is to fill in the lake! Please magnify the attached flyer I found posted at the bath rooms on the Winfield side of the lake. I kid you not, this gem in the neighborhood may be gone forever!

If you can pass the word on to your family and friends and can make it to the meeting on March 13 to discuss the fate of this amazing little lake in the 'hood, I'd appreciate it!

So, what do you think about this? I want your valuable opinion.
Every single person on this board is against the idea of filling in the lake. The flyer doesn't mention the lake being filled in? Where did you hear that?

The flyer also fails to mention why mercury input is bad. Why do we care about mercury input?

I don't see why methyl mercury is an issue. I've only heard about it being an issue if you eat contaminated fish. It's not like anyone (except the homeless people) eats any of the fish in the guadalupe watershed. The mercury doesn't harm the fish and I dont think it becomes part of the drinking water source. I imagine the mercury doesn't get into the aquifer.
I agree, I don't see the harm, and IF you do eat the fish, I mean, that's on you.. If the fish are fine with it so am I. I like having a place to catch decent fish so close to town.
I heard it from a park ranger. I agree that mercury is a non-issue since its not only well known, but it is clearly posted throughout the lake.
Sucks if they fill it. Anyone gonna go? Wish I could but gotta work.
I consider the mercury in our lakes a blessing. I know some people still fill their buckets with these fish, but I see it as Darwin's Law enforcing catch and release. The beauty of this law is that nobody needs to be paid by our Government to enforce it. As witnessed in another recent thread here, some people are bound and determined to fill their gut with some delicious CH3Hg. Can you imagine if they suddenly declared the fish safe to eat? How long do you think the fish populations would last?
houla wrote:
I consider the mercury in our lakes a blessing. I know some people still fill their buckets with these fish, but I see it as Darwin's Law enforcing catch and release. The beauty of this law is that nobody needs to be paid by our Government to enforce it. As witnessed in another recent thread here, some people are bound and determined to fill their gut with some delicious CH3Hg. Can you imagine if they suddenly declared the fish safe to eat? How long do you think the fish populations would last?



What a wonderful point...
Dave ,
I will try to make it , hope to see you there along with others who care about our access to local lakes . I don't even fish this lake , but fisherman need to voice their opinion.
One thing is for sure , if people DO NOT show up , the people at SCVWD will think whatever they want to do is OK .
see ya next week .
Robb
I'm going to try and make it, I have class from 6-9 on Wednesdays but, I can always tell my professor where I'm going, she will understand, as it is a valid reason.
I wish I knew more about the whole situation.. BUT my questions are:

1.) Where is the mercury coming from? (**Answer** - Alamaden Quick Silver Mines)

**Follow up** - Does it come through ground water? or diverted from the mountain into streams that run into the lake?

2.) Why would filling it in be a worthwhile solution?

**Follow up** - How will filling it in help the mercury contamination? If it's through ground water, wont we just be delaying the inevitable pollution of a second body of water elsewhere?

- If it's through run off from the mountain, where will the run off go from there, to another body of water? Filling in the lake will only be a temporary issue solution, as finding and fixing the source would lead to a more "efficient" solution. Fixing something temporarily with tax dollars, just to have to fix it again later somewhere else is not a economic way to do things in this current economic climate.

3.) Aren't we the technology capital of the US? Why don't you ask the university's to hold a contest for a solution for the marine biology, environmental ecology, or ANY of the sciences?
Hopefully the steelhead protectors will be there to make their voices heard too!