How Does High Flow Rates From Rivers/Creeks Effect Fishing?

Looking at data points for department of water shows some of the highest cubic feet per second flows in the past week that we have had in 3 years. When I was down on the Los Gatos on Sunday the water had ripped through it leaving tules flattened in some areas.

Adam
well in creek/stream/river setting, this will most likely wash most of the warm water fish species out. They are not designed to handle extreme current like a steelhead/trout/salmon would be able to, sure are some backwaters and deeper pools which they may be able to get out of the main channel, but most would probably be washed down. Also with high currents comes lots of sediment pick up, especially in this area with all the damns. If you havent gone out to many of the local lakes right now with streams flowing into them they look like chocalate milk, almaden reservoir and almaden lake for example
blackbag wrote:
Looking at data points for department of water shows some of the highest cubic feet per second flows in the past week that we have had in 3 years. When I was down on the Los Gatos on Sunday the water had ripped through it leaving tules flattened in some areas.

Adam


I live in Chico and hunt/fish the sac multiple times a week. The high flows like we are experiencing now absolutely kills the bite. That being said, when the water clears back out and returns to normal, there are a lot of very hungry fish waiting for you. Like dirtymax was saying though, bass in creeks are going to be blown out way worse than other colder water species. Fish the mouths of creeks and rivers as fish will stack where the current slows down and feed on any food that comes rushing downstream.
Yeah those warm water fish species often get washed out during storms and die but certain parts are easily repopulated by our bass/carp-filled reservoirs. Certain streams have high gradients which result in steep channel conditions such as fewer slow water habitats. You can catch bass in some of the creeks here like the slow sections of coyote creek but not at the moment because its closed to fishing. DFG set the regulations to match and protect the potential spawning time of steelhead and salmon. And the game wardens are patrolling the area.

Aquatic systems are complex and interesting. As that storm turned our creeks into fast flowing rivers, mighty steelhead trout fought their way upstream against the torrential current, determined to reach their spawning grounds.
im with u ender have taken a couple classes specifically on this and the local waters