How many rods do you bring shorefishing?

Hey, wondering how many setups/rods you guys bring shorefishing. I tend to bring atleast 2 but would love to bring 5. Lol, is that excessive? And if you only bring one, what setup are you using? Line weight, reel (baitcaster/spinning), and lures etc...
I bring two most of the time. An ultra light penrod setup for C or T-rigs and a Medium with braid for frog /swim/topwater lures.

I tend to use the ultra light 95% of the time.
I usually bring along 2-3, but I've seen some guys on here carry like 5+...hahaha.
2 usually, one spinning w/ braid for worms, jigs etc, another spinning w/ mono for cranks / spinners.
I find 2 to be somewhat of a PIA, can't imagine carrying 5 around.
I bring 2 at the most, any more than that can be a pain to carry.
I alway find myself bringing 2 spinning rods, just something I grew up using and comfortable with. Plus I can cast a mile with them. I have 2 baitcasters I always leave behind due to not being able to cast well or far with them. One baitcaster is for my C & T rigs, the other is a broomstick with 65lb braid for frogging and topwater. The two spinning setups (one is 8lb flouro, other is 10lb flouro) are for everything else like jigs, spinners, dropshot, and cranks. Though when I bring spinning they double as frog and C&T rigs too. Thanks for the response guys, gives me a better idea what setups I should hone on bringing on an average day.
When i go shorefishing i usually bring two rods, a UL spinning rod with mono, and a casting rod filled with 65lb test braid for frogging and swim/crank/jigging.
I usually bring 2 like everyone says. One spinning med or light for worms with 4lb test. The other is a baitcaster med for cranks and reaction or a med hvy for jigs.
I usually carry 3. 1 ultralight spinner for trout, 1 medium for bass, cat, etc and 1 telescoping for strippers.

AW
I usually only bring one. But keep in mind if you have two lines in the water at the same time you have to have a seconed rod stamp.
I used to bring two but it was just a pain to carry both of them.
One.

I dont understand why bass fishermen like to bring 3+ rods. It's like they need an entire rod for crankbaiting, one for topwater, one for plastics, and one for swimbaits. It's just silly in my opinion. I once saw one guy in his floatube with 6 fishing rods.
I'm usually carrying 2-3. One cranking rod, one worm/jig rod and sometimes a finesse rod (spinning or baitcasting) depending on where I'm going or how the bite has been.

Ender wrote:
One.

I dont understand why bass fishermen like to bring 3+ rods. It's like they need an entire rod for crankbaiting, one for topwater, one for plastics, and one for swimbaits. It's just silly in my opinion. I once saw one guy in his floatube with 6 fishing rods.


Not silly at all.

For serious bass guys, different rods or setups are preferred for different techniques, simply because it will increase your chances for bites and/or landing the fish.

A flipping setup with a heavy rod and 65lb braid isn't optimal when fishing cranks, for example. Not enough flex in the rod and the heavy line could spook the fish. Likewise, a cranking setup would not work as a flipping stick. Too soft of a rod and light line will snap fish off before you get the fish out of the slop. The slower action of the cranking rod is perfect though for preventing fish from throwing treble-hooked lures. A worm/jig rod usually has more power than a cranking stick for more positive hooksets with larger, single hook presentations.

Bottom line is, you can use one rod for multiple applications, but it's not going to be the best solution for all of them.

Another maybe more obvious reason as that it's much easier to switch techniques when you've got multiple rods. Less retying while on the water.
Ender wrote:
One.

I dont understand why bass fishermen like to bring 3+ rods. It's like they need an entire rod for crankbaiting, one for topwater, one for plastics, and one for swimbaits. It's just silly in my opinion. I once saw one guy in his floatube with 6 fishing rods.



Opinions are like , well ya know that old sayn'. ;|
Ender wrote:
One.

I dont understand why bass fishermen like to bring 3+ rods. It's like they need an entire rod for crankbaiting, one for topwater, one for plastics, and one for swimbaits. It's just silly in my opinion. I once saw one guy in his floatube with 6 fishing rods.



Well I must look friggin retarded then when I put 9 rods on my kickboat. When I'm on the water, I like to be fishing, not constantly re-tying or bird watching. All those technique specific rods aren't doing me any good sitting at home...
This year I did get a second rod stamp, just so I could soak a trout or cat/ carp line while bassin. I guess I'll be out there with 3 from now on. Also FROGFLIPPER, I bring 6 when on my kayak. If I had 9 I'd surely bring them all.
1 or 2, depending on what I was fishing for. I mostly use plastics so it'll usually just be a MedLight or Med single rod, but if I feel like chucking a swim jig or something heavier I'll bring a beefier pole. Also like someone else said if you have a second rod stamp and depending where you are you can always soak bait on a second rod.

I see people on boats all the time with multiple rods/setups, and instead of re-tying they just pick up and cast...if you can manage carrying multiple poles around from the shore I can totally understand that.
Depends on season to me. In winter, I carry at least 3: Drop-shot spinning rod, Bait caster with a jig and trailer and a swim bait/carolina rig rod.

Any other season, I'll have up to 6 that includes 2 spinning and 3 bait casters to cover all the techniques I'm confident with.

I know it seems a pain, but I don't have as much fishing time to mess with retying constantly and like in a tournament, I want to be able to change tactics on the fly based on conditions. I can't tell you how many times I've seen a change in wind direction, or a bait school get pushed up and I nailed them with top waters, cranks or blades - I would've never have caught those fish if I wasn't ready.

To make rod carrying easier, a cost effective way to carry rods is to buy a cheap rifle sling and 2 velcro straps to make your own rod carrier. I'm sure some of you may have seen me with all those rods and a backpack at Almaden or the Perc's! I get a lot of comments from non-anglers all the time and I tell them the old analogy with golf - You can't use a putter when you're driving down a fairway! Same thing I told my ex-wife! lol

There's always an exception - if i'm on a strong pattern and don't have more than an hour to fish, I'll only bring two rods with similar baits ready to go.

Also, I didn't invest thousands in bass gear to NOT use them whenever I can :D


Tightlnes!
Ender wrote:
One.

I dont understand why bass fishermen like to bring 3+ rods. It's like they need an entire rod for crankbaiting, one for topwater, one for plastics, and one for swimbaits. It's just silly in my opinion. I once saw one guy in his floatube with 6 fishing rods.


We're all crazy I tell ya!
Mostly one rod for bankfishing. Usually M/H baitcaster, sometimes M spinning, always longer rod. I like to keep walking around and casting around without picking up stuff every time I move. I saw guys with rods attached to their backpack/funnypack and I tried that, but didn't like it. Time to time, I keep my second rod in the car just in case I need heavier / lighter setup.

My theory is older generation carry one rod. :)
for me it's usually one or two . when on the pontoon it's 4 , when in the boat , it's 9 or 10.
I always like Ender's response to these . No Idea ?
Ender-- here's the reason's .
technique specific reasons and not having to re-tie everytime you want to throw something different in the same spot .Hit more spots with a much higher chance of a hook -up.
Example , when I throw a spinnerbait and get a short strike - I immediatley throw a weightless Senko in that spot and see if that fish will attack again. OR , I might switch to a smaller spinnerbait to that same spot .
Without question , more rods rigged up saves time and catches more fish with your time on the water.
tight lines
Robb